Report says CRE leaders expect post covid resurgence

In May, law firm DLA Piper released the 2022 edition of their Annual State of the Market Survey report, highlighting that “optimism about the future of commercial real estate (CRE)” remains strong despite the headwinds the industry faces.

The survey on which the report is built was conducted in February and March of 2022, by collating and analyzing input from CRE leaders and professionals in the US – specifically their take on matters including “pandemic recovery, economic outlook, attractiveness of investment markets and overall expectations over the next 12 months”. This input is further contextualized with additional research, presented the report.

Highlights

Overall, the report [PDF] shows “increased bullishness”, with “more respondents in 2022 [having] a higher level of confidence for the real estate industry’s next 12 months”.

Findings from the report also include that 73 percent of respondents are “expecting a bullish market”. This is consistent with 2021 expectations. “However,” they added, “this year, respondents reported feeling a higher level of confidence in a bull market over the next 12 months; 33 percent described their bullishness as an 8 or higher in 2022, compared to just 16 percent in 2021.”

Top contributing reasons include the apparent availability of capital in the market, with over half of the respondents citing this as the main source of their confidence.

Viewed per sector, Commercial Property Executive says in their analysis of the report, “Industrial (66 percent) and multifamily (57 percent) remain the property types that investors believe offer the best risk-adjusted returns over the next 12 months.”

Shaping CRE

Inflation and interest rate changes were ranked most likely to have an impact specifically in the CRE market in the coming year, but ecommerce, migration of workers out of city centers, and the “redesign/reimagining use of office and other commercial spaces” were also common responses.

Concerns remain

Top concerns included interest rate increases (cited by 26 percent of respondents), inflation (18 percent), as well as the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

US gains and advice

Finally, respondents to the survey said they felt the US would be seen as a safe and stable option, attracting non-US investment. “During times of uncertainty – like the pandemic or the conflict in Ukraine — investors often flock to safe havens,” the report reads, adding “a well-defined legal system, transparency and proven economic resiliency” are among the US’s assets.  

In the face of global uncertainty though, the report authors caution that CRE professionals and firms must “remain agile and prioritize adaption, with an eye towards staying ahead of the curve”.

SOCIAL: Do you see the US CRE market as a safe haven in times of global uncertainty? How do you expect inflation to make itself known in your CRE specialty?

Advertisement

REITs sag under general market pressure in April, May 2022

The Q2 2022 has been a scary ride for markets and investors around the world. Increased geopolitical tensions, widespread inflation, and rising interest rates in many territories have been a cause for concern, and the capital markets bore the brunt of that low sentiment.

A recent look at the numbers shows that real estate investment trusts (REITs) didn’t escape the sell-off.

Crunching the numbers

The FTSE Nareit All Equity REITs index shows a decline of 3.66 percent in April. This is, as Wealth Management succinctly argues, “a major reversal from 2021, when REITs posted a 40 percent rise in total returns”.

Benchmarking against peers

Despite this, REIT total returns are trending stronger than many other indices in 2022, including some “darlings of the market” like S&P 500 (contracted 12.92 percent) and the Dow Jones Industrial Average (declined by 8.73 percent).

A history of performance

Bezinga data says: “The FTSE Nareit All Equity REITs index has outperformed the S&P 500 in total returns during 13 out of the last 20 years with an average total annual return of 13.1% versus 11.1% for the S&P 500 over the same time period”.

REITs use case

As an investment vehicle type, REITs are considered one of the most accessible ways for individuals to buy into commercial real estate (CRE), which has long been the terrain of institutional investors.

Although regulation changes have opened up this category in recent years, REITs still enjoy popularity with retail investors for the above reasons, and the relatively high dividend yields.

Takeaway

Although we do not offer this as financial advice and individual investment products must be reviewed on their own fundamentals, REITs are still largely considered an inflation hedge when rents are rising – making them one fascinating asset type to watch in 2022.

What’s happening in… Seoul?

Bukchon Hanok Village in Seoul, South Korea

Seoul is the capital of South Korea – officially the Republic of Korea. It is a massive, bustling city known for its amazing street food, pop culture influence, and cutting-edge technology, but it’s also an ancient city with many sites of historic significance.

This clash of the new and old – temples and skyscrapers, street markets, and teched-out headquarters – is one of the many reasons that Seoul remains a popular destination for global and regional tourists, while its robust and advanced infrastructure keeps it a business hub too.

Geared for industry and export

South Korea’s economic success is one for the textbooks – countless case studies have been done on the rapid transformation that took this economy from a “developing nation” to a global leader in record time. These days, South Korea is one of the top five largest economies in Asia, and within the top ten in the world – or 14th by some estimates.

Today, the gross domestic product (GDP) hovers around the $2 trillion mark – driven by an emphasis on research and development, value chain dominance, exports, and a highly-skilled workforce. Seoul is the epicenter of the economic activity in the country, especially in terms of electronics and finance.

Leading industries in Korea include electronics (especially semiconductors and mobile phones), telecommunications, vehicle production, shipbuilding, steel, and chemicals. Additionally, the economy of South Korea is largely export-oriented.

According to NAI Global’s partner in Seoul, NAI Korea, the country’s economy showed “clear signs of rapid recovery in 2021 with the economy expanding 4% year-on-year and is expected to be about the same in 2022”.

Residential market factors

In terms of population, Seoul has been designated a mega-city for having more than ten million residents. Residents typically enjoy high levels of education and employment, but housing does come with a certain premium – as in any large city.

To address this, the city government recently agreed to lift the 35-story restriction on residential buildings. Property prices tracking in the city is a mixed bag, but largely steady — with some parties recording a 0,03 percent decline recently and others a 0,01 percent increase.

Commercial property outlook

Office space, logistics, and warehousing remain “top of the pops” for Seoul commercial real estate, with major companies like Samsung, chip maker TES, Hyundai, and LG, as well as offices of Amazon, Deloitte, and IBM, all maintaining a considerable presence in the city.

Significant portions of Seoul have been earmarked for rejuvenation, while other regions – such as Gangnam – have enjoyed lengthy periods of consistent interest and investment. Where public spending on rejuvenation has been undertaken, significant public and commercial benefits have been realized.

For example, greening and restoration of the Cheonggyecheon district had a dramatic impact on land prices therein. As the World Bank notes: “Before the restoration, land prices within a 100-meter radius of the Cheonggyecheon were only 15 percent higher compared to those within a 600-meter radius. However, after the transformation to a green space, the gap in value doubled by 30 percent.”

For more regional insight, contact NAI Global’s partner in Seoul, NAI Korea.

Multifamily debt data reaches new record at end 2021

Recent data from the Mortgage Bankers Association’s (MBA) latest Commercial/Multifamily Mortgage Debt Outstanding report shows that the level of outstanding debt on commercial/multifamily mortgages – during the final three months of 2021 – was $287 billion (7.4 percent) higher than the level seen at the end of 2020.

Report frequency

The MBA releases this data on a quarterly basis and this provides a snapshot of debt and market health at the time. Released at the end of March 2022, this report focuses on the last quarter of 2021 – and compares figures to the preceding quarter and the corresponding quarter of the previous year.

For the purposes of this research, the four major investor groups considered include: “bank and thrift; commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS), collateralized debt obligation (CDO) and other asset-backed securities (ABS) issues; federal agency and government-sponsored enterprise (GSE) portfolios and mortgage-backed securities (MBS); and life insurance companies”.

Their data shows that “total mortgage debt outstanding rose by 2.9 percent ($116.0 billion) in fourth-quarter 2021” and specifically that “multifamily mortgage debt grew by $42.1 billion (2.4 percent) to $1.81 trillion during the fourth quarter, and by $121.9 billion (7.2 percent) for the entire year”.

Understanding the data

MBA’s Vice President of Commercial Real Estate Research Jamie Woodwell commented: “Strong borrowing and lending backed by commercial and multifamily properties drove the level of mortgage debt outstanding to a new high at the end of 2021.”

This was evident in every major capital source, he said, adding: “The 7.4 percent annual increase in outstanding debt compares to a 19.5 percent increase in underlying property values.”  

As Yield Pro points out in their analysis, government-sponsored enterprises (GSE) “continued to have the largest share of multifamily mortgages outstanding”.

In related material, MBA confirmed that commercial and multifamily mortgage delinquencies in the US also declined in Q4 2021, characterizing the rates as “down or flat for every major investor group”.

Can a mortgage be issued for virtual land? Apparently, it can in the metaverse

In a recent NAI article, we looked at the advent of the metaverse[SR1]  and what this new tech might mean for commercial real estate (CRE). Though we concluded that the answer to how the metaverse might impact the real world remains uncertain, since then, there have been some interesting virtual developments.

In particular, tech company TerraZero has started issuing “mortgages” for virtual real estate, and there’s very real money changing hands for entirely virtual properties.

A slice of (online) paradise?

To be clear, the “mortgages” in this case are funded entirely by TerraZero itself, rather than an external financial institution, but employ a system of down payment and instalments, much like the real thing. The first one was issued for a piece of land on a platform called Decentraland, where users can own, and sell, virtual assets. And as strange as this all sounds from a real estate perspective, there have recently been several big players setting up shop in the virtual world.

Perhaps the biggest, from a credibility point of view, is global financial leaders JPMorgan who recently launched a “virtual bank”, though at the moment it’s only being used for marketing purposes. In tandem with the purchase, JPMorgan issued a report, where they discuss their expectations for the metaverse’s development, saying:

“The success of building and scaling in the metaverse is dependent on having a robust and flexible financial ecosystem that will allow users to seamlessly connect between the physical and virtual worlds.”

They added that, in just the last six months of 2021, the average price for a virtual plot of land jumped from $6,000 to $12,000.

Hedging bets

Despite this apparent endorsement from one of the world’s leading financiers, there are still plenty of metaverse critics urging caution. One of the main points raised is that, unlike physical real estate, metaverse purchases can’t satisfy both property value fundamentals: namely scarcity and location.

Or as Louis Rosenberg, CEO of Unanimous AI and a veteran Augmented Reality (AR) developer, puts it:

“We don’t even know which platforms are [going to] be popular, let alone which locations… so it’s like somebody buying a piece of land anywhere in America and hoping that it becomes San Francisco or New York.”

For many companies though, hedging bets is taking the form of securing their own piece of the virtual pie. The Wall Street Journal reports that accounting firms PricewaterhouseCoopers and Prager Metis have also recently snapped up virtual sites, with the latter spending $35,000 on its purchase of a virtual HQ.

Is the metaverse here to stay?

Though it’s still early days, and impossible to say how the virtual property trend might play out, the recent developments in the space suggest it’s certainly worth keeping an eye on. At the very least, the metaverse poses an interesting proposition, and one a lot of people seem to be willing to speculate on.

SOCIAL: Do you think there’s a future for metaverse property? And if so, how do you see it unfolding?