Stabilizing employment rates good news for commercial real estate?

Employment numbers are up according to a recent news release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In their analysis, BLS announced that the unemployment rate had dropped to 3.5%, with 528,000 new jobs added over the course of the month.

These figures mean that, for the first time, unemployment measures have returned to their February 2020, pre-pandemic levels. BLS also noted that the gains were led by the leisure and hospitality industry.

Strong recovery in hospitality

Reporting on the figures, Real Deal pointed out that hiring at hotels, restaurants and bars was responsible for a large percentage of the 528 000 jobs created in July. Together with construction and healthcare, these sectors accounted for 43% of the overall job gains posted. Quoted in the article, Mortgage Bankers Association Chief Economist, Mike Fratantoni added: “This is not a picture of an economy in recession.”

Mixed results for other sectors

Though the construction industry was a strong performer, with an additional 32,000 employees hired, it’s worth noting that this figure would likely have been much higher if there were more workers available. The sector is still deep in the grips of a labor shortage that has put pressure on projects across the US, and led to a slow-down in new developments.

Meanwhile, the office sector also faced constraints, with the percentage of workers staying remote due to the pandemic remaining at 7.1%, exactly the same as in June.  As one of our NAI Offices recently reported, the future of offices has generated some strong dissenting opinions among those in the know, and exactly how the situation is going to pan out remains unclear.

Shifting sands

Though some of these figures certainly seem to indicate an upturn, it’s worth bearing in mind that there are still many indicators of a possible recession. As recently as a month before these figures were posted, there were announcements of cutbacks in the residential sector, and some experts were predicting a drop-off in employment rates.

For other experts, the picture is more nuanced. Lawrence Yun, Chief Economist at the National Association of Realtors (NAR) puts it like this:

“It would be one of the most unusual recessions — if it [the economy] does technically reach it — in that there are worker shortages. Some industries will lay off workers, but there could still be more job openings than the number unemployed throughout the recession.”

Long-term prospects

How the current job situation plays out, and how this affects Commercial Real Estate professionals, remains to be seen. We do know that the employment numbers we are seeing now exceed predictions that were made just a few months ago. If the positive trend in hospitality and construction continues, there could be a lot of new projects, and prospects, on the cards.

SOCIAL: How have hiring trends impacted commercial rentals and development projects in your area?

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Strong recovery on the cards for US, Europe hospitality

Over the last few years, the hospitality industry has taken some hard hits. And for Commercial Real Estate (CRE) professionals focusing on the sector, 2020 may well have felt like a trial by fire. When we looked at the industry last year, however, things were starting to look up, with at least some evidence of a mounting recovery.

The good news in 2022 is that, as business travel and tourism resume, the hospitality sector seems set to hit highs we haven’t seen since before the pandemic.

RevPAR revving up

According to a recent article by hospitality analysts STR, the RevPAR (Revenue Per Available Room) for U.S. hotels is set to surpass levels seen in 2019. RevPAR is an important metric for the industry and is used by owners to calculate hotel performance. The new predictions suggest a $6 increase in RevPAR compared to 2019.

It’s worth noting though that the gains fall short when adjusted for inflation, and it’s likely the industry will only achieve full recovery in 2024. That said, the sentiment in the hospitality sector still seems to be bullish, especially on the back of average daily occupancy rates of nearly 60% in May this year.

Back in Business

One factor that seems to be fueling the gains is an uptick in business travel. STR president Amanda Hite states: “…right now, we are forecasting demand to reach historic levels in 2023 as business travel recovery has ramped up and joined the incredible demand from the leisure sector.”

The New York Times adds that domestic business travel in particular is on the increase, with cities like Las Vegas leading the pack in terms of the number of trade shows and events scheduled in 2022.

While the recovery for international travel seems to be slower, they note that business trips to Europe are leading recuperation on that front.

The European connection

The hospitality situation in Europe is certainly heating up, with many top destinations reporting strong gains in the last few months.

In Paris, for example, the hotel market is expected to make an early recovery, buoyed by tourism and international events like the Rugby World Cup and Olympic Games. Meanwhile Berlin hotels are also reporting hikes in RevPAR and occupancy, and Portugal is anticipating pre-pandemic levels of tourism in 2023.

A hopeful outlook

Taken together, these latest reports suggest that there may be some welcome relief for the hospitality sector as travel, both for business and pleasure, resumes. Going into 2023 and 2024, we may see a level of robust recovery that means the industry can finally put the hard times of the last few years behind it.

SOCIAL: For those working in hospitality real estate, how are the numbers stacking up in your area? And how do you anticipate the trend developing through the rest of 2022?

Watch this space: Industrial boom continues into late 2021, and beyond

We’ve all seen how the Covid-19 pandemic gave the industrial sector the shove it needed to go from well-poised to interstellar. Now research from the Commercial Real Estate Development Association (NAOIP) suggests there is no slowing down for commercial real estate’s (CRE) newest darling sector.

The NAIOP’s Industrial Space Demand Forecast for Q3 2021 shows that “sustained growth in e-commerce [and] demand for industrial real estate continues to outpace supply”. This, they say, puts the sector in a state of net absorption that will continue throughout the year and into 2022.

Digging into the numbers

The authors of the report are Hany Guirguis, PhD, Manhattan College and Michael J. Seiler, DBA, College of William & Mary. They write that “the demand for industrial real estate still outpaces supply” even with “nearly 100 million new square feet delivered nationally since the beginning of the year, 450 million square feet currently under construction and another 450 million planned”.

Their data then boils down to net absorption of some 162.6 million SF in the second half of the year, and they state that they’ve “returned to their pre-pandemic confidence levels”.

Triangulating more data
The demand has of course been driven primarily by the boom in e-commerce. GlobeSt.com reports that e-commerce sales hit “a quarterly record of $222 billion in the second quarter of this year”, accounting for 13.3% of all retail sales. But there are contributing factors, such as growth in cold storage, materials and construction, manufacturing and medical industries.

With the combination of factors, CRE data analysts such as YardiMatrix are predicting the growth to stay buoyant through 2026. Yardi’s predictions include delivery of 348 million SF next year, 360 million SF in 2023, and up to 370 million SF in 2026.

New growth
There are other blooming products and industry categories that will only increase this demand. The cannabis processing industry is hungry for space in deregulated regions and in countries with widespread legalization like Canada and Latin America. Finally, there are superlative predictions for the industrial square-footage needs of the commercial space industry too.

No wonder, NAIOP CEO Thomas J. Bisacquino calls industrial “a bright spot in the CRE industry”.

Health check: the state of hospitality and hotel CRE

An economy reconfigured

It’s been a rollercoaster 18 months for everyone including market analysts who have had to provide insight and predictions on an unprecedented event, as the world bounded through recession, recovery, and reconfiguration. As it stands now, the US recovery has been swift, if uneven.

GlobeSt’s latest piece on this makes the argument for understanding this recession in different terms from so-called traditional ones, writing: “The COVID-19 recession was not caused by monetary factors, rather it has been a disruption akin to an unanticipated natural disaster which typically temporarily interrupts economic activity while leaving intact the underlying demand and supply of goods and services.”

Outlook

The above forms part of their outlook reporting for hotel sales, and as has been well-established hotels, tourism, and hospitality were dramatically affected during the peak of the pandemic travel-bans and “shelter at home” orders.

GlobeSt points to some encouraging signs, including the volume of startup businesses launching, low levels of household debt-service burdens (in relation to net income), rising house prices, increases in personal savings, and the Dow Jones Industrial Averaging gaining some 18% compared to Feb 2020 (a pre-pandemic peak for the index). Altogether, these are positive signs that the American consumer may well have additional discretionary spending in the coming months, and the tourism space could be on the receiving end.

Corporate travel is expected to increase in the second half of the year, on top of the increases already evidenced in daytrippers and weekend travel. As schools reopen, they are anticipating patterns to shift from leisure to work trips.

Early 2021 winners

The Wall Street Journal reported earlier this year that real estate investment trusts (REITs) and companies with holdings in retail and hotels “mounted a first-quarter comeback”.

“Real-estate investment trusts overall rose 9% during the three months, beating the S&P 500’s 6% gain,” according to data-analytics firm Green Street. Fueling the REIT rally was an 18% rise in the shares of lodging owners and a 32% gain by mall owners.

Creative strategies
Additionally, according to CNBC, distressed hotels were in demand from buyers looking for possible redevelopment and conversion projects, and other creative solutions to the low supply of affordable housing. “So-called Class C housing stock is now 96% occupied nationally and 99% occupied in the Midwest, according to RealPage, a property management software company,” CNBC writes.

And for hotels with no intentions of conversion – the vast majority – the pandemic also provided a kind of reset that allows for model innovation. “Similar to the airline’s ala carte approach, the hotel industry is attempting to move guests toward an opt-in choice for various services, such as daily room cleaning,” reports GlobeSt.

Counting the deals
This article provides a deep dive into specific deals and statistics from hotel sales and performance in 2021 so far and is a recommended read for those CRE professionals servicing the submarket.

It will also make for interesting reading from a capital markets perspective as it details funding activity: “As the U.S. hotel industry continues to emerge from the carnage induced by the global pandemic, an abundance of capital is beginning to fuel increasing activity with lodging sector mergers, acquisitions, and spinoffs,” they wrote.